PMIEF to Offer New No-Cost Educational Resource for CTE

 

21 October 2016

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Written by Michelle Armstrong

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PMIEF to Offer New No-Cost Educational Resource for CTE

Editor’s Note:  After publication of this article, the Career & Technical Education Guides were added to the PMIEF Learning Resources Library.  They are available for download immediately. 

PMIEF will soon release Project Management for Career & Technical Education, a no-cost educational resource that offers project management-rich curricula for secondary school career and technical education (CTE) teachers. The curricula target teachers who would like to integrate project management into their coursework and are comprised of three projects each for business, finance and marketing classes. Designed to complement CTE instruction, the curricula allow teachers to engage students in hands-on learning even as students identify connections between school and real-world careers in business-related professions.

Project Management for Career & Technical Education, which PMIEF developed in partnership with MBAResearch & Curriculum Center (MBAResearch), introduces students to project management fundamentals such as how to develop a project charter, define a scope statement, and create plans to ensure quality and risk management. In addition, the curricula encourage students’ self- and peer assessment as well as their reflection on lessons learned.

PMIEF piloted the curricula in nearly 70 U.S. secondary school CTE classes during the 2015-16 school year through a grant-funded initiative. In addition, the foundation commissioned an external evaluation of the pilot, with particular attention paid to teachers’ and students’ perspectives on both the curricula and the value project management adds to course instruction. Surveys and interviews with teachers revealed the overwhelming majority believe project management will help students better manage their time (98 percent), work collaboratively with others (96 percent) and prepare for a future career (93 percent).

Similarly, the evaluation found most students who received project management instruction through the curricula understand concepts such as maintaining a schedule, closing a project, and reflecting on a project’s successes and challenges (56 percent). In addition, they regularly apply their project management training to other coursework and extracurricular activities.  

PMIEF and MBAResearch refined Project Management for Career & Technical Education based on evaluation data to better ensure teachers’ efforts to integrate project management into secondary school curricula. This aligns with the foundation’s sustained commitment to develop PM Knowledgeable Youth who are prepared for academic and professional success.  

Teachers may wish to use Project Management for Career & Technical Education with other PMIEF learning resources for youth such as Project Management Toolkit for Teachers and Project Management Toolkit for Youth. For more information, please visit the PMIEF.org website at the end of November.