Joslyn Sato Shares How PM Skills Have Made an Impact on Her Kids

 

29 October 2020

Published inPM for Social Good

Topics Youth

Joslyn Sato headshot

Joslyn Sato knows the importance of teaching youth project management as a life skill. It’s not only a key part of her role as the Academic Outreach Director for the PMI Honolulu, Hawaii Chapter, it’s a key lesson she shares with her kids everyday as it relates to the projects in their life. 

“Kids start learning about projects as early as primary school, so when I talk to my kids about their schoolwork, we create a mini project plan together to complete their tasks. It really has helped so much - even with helping them understand what needs to go into a project. We’ve all been that parent that’s running out last minute to get the poster board late at night for the last-minute project! I find that project management has not only helped them complete their school project “assignments” but has also had an impact on the way they learn,” said Sato in a recent interview with the PMI Educational Foundation

Sato, who has a PMP and DM in Organizational Management, is the Statewide Program Manager at Blue Zones Project, Hawaii, joined PMI in 2010 and began volunteering shortly thereafter. 

“Being a part of PMI, the Honolulu Chapter and leading academic outreach has allowed me to not only empower other youth within my community and youth-serving non-profits, it has allowed me to become a role model to my own children where I can help them lead and be successful in school,” said Sato.

 

Because project management is a practical skill to have, and since children are assigned projects at an early age, we need to equip them with tools to help them be successful now as well as develop the application of project management as a natural skill so they can also be successful in their future work environment.

Joslyn Sato, PMP PMIEF/PMI Chapter Liaison
 

In the video and Q&A below, Joslyn shares how project management has made a difference in her personal and professional life, the impact of the PMI Honolulu, Hawaii Chapter, and how you can empower the youth in your life to learn project management – starting today.

 
 
  

PMIEF: Tell us a little bit about yourself.

JS: About 5 years ago I joined the PMI Honolulu, Hawaii Chapter Board as their first Director of Academic Outreach and also served as their PMIEF/PMI Chapter Liaison.  As a parent, I have seen the benefits that project management had for my children, which developed a strong passion for sharing project management with youth.
 

PMIEF: How did you become involved with PMIEF?

JS: As the Director of Academic Outreach with the PMI Honolulu, Hawaii Chapter, I also serve as the PMIEF/PMI Chapter Liaison. Over the past 6-months, because of working virtually I’ve been able to learn more about PMIEF, connect with other liaisons, and engage in more PMIEF opportunities.

PMIEF: How has project management made an impact in your professional life?

JS: When initially earning my PMP, I was early in my career and it was something my company had me take but I had no clue at that time what project management was about.  Fast forward to today, project management has been a natural practice in any job that I hold. Even more importantly, leveraging my knowledge and skills into new job environments that don't necessarily have "project managers", a "PMO", or think about projects the way we do, has allowed me to incorporate project management practices that create efficient processes, better collaboration, and all the benefits of achieving project success.
  

PMIEF: How has project management made an impact in your personal life? 

JS: On a personal level, it's also integrated in my personal projects and I've been able to leverage practices to also help my children with their school projects.  Project management and PMI has opened the opportunity for me to share my passions with youth and youth serving non-profits in Hawaii. So, on a personal level, project management has allowed me to innovate, share practical skills, and bring my professional experience to the academic environment. Thus, allowing me to help impact our future leaders, future project managers, and future project team members.

PMIEF: Why do you think it's important to learn project management early in life as a life skill?

JS: Project management is a practical skill. As project managers we see projects through a different lens; however, you cannot wait until you enter the workforce to gain project management knowledge. Projects start the minute you start elementary school. 

If you look back at your education, or at the "assignments" your children bring home, you'll see that children are performing and managing individual or team projects. So, projects are something that we introduce to children at an early age, but we don't expose them to the "how" or teach them the skills and knowledge that they can use.  

Because project management is a practical skill to have, and since children are assigned projects at an early age, we need to equip them with tools to help them be successful now as well as develop the application of project management as a natural skill so they can also be successful in their future work environment, or even make a career out of it!

It's really the missing piece that you didn't know to look for, and it's the piece that you can't live without!